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Thursday, September 25, 2014

U15G - U15 Girls Youth Soccer

This page is focused on Under 15 girls youth soccer in Region 1.

During this transition from middle school soccer to high school soccer, teams seem to change as quickly as the players do.

Stay tuned.

479 comments:

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Anonymous said...

554 you are mistaken
Region 1 league last year included CFC Arsenal which is the B team to the ECNL team called CFC United. The CFC club well understands at tryouts that the best kids are funnelled to the unitied teams after the ECNL ages.

Further my comment on B teams in rgion 1 wasn't intended to be limited to ECNL B teams. The NEFC B team (premier) played region 1 last year not their A team (Elite)

A testement of the times with the best teams scattered across too many leagues to provide consistent competition for the best players.

Anonymous said...

It is a market driven situation and the customers seem to be supporting a big variety of teams of leagues. It is driven as much by money as by the ability and location of the players.

Now there are options beyond the immediate local area for good players that want to pursue them and pay for them.

Anonymous said...

The uber competitive top level is in for some frustration because it is difficult to consolidate them in one place and they could benefit from playing with and against other uber soccer stars. Income disparity, transportation availability, scheduling conflicts are all road blocks to gathering together a top team.

But oh well, of all the challenges to face, not having the perfect soccer team is insignificant.

Anonymous said...

Question
If your child is one of the top 5 players (assuming that a rank order is definable)on her team, the team at least plays region1 and top flight at Jeff cup, CASL, NEWSS etc, is not unhappy with the coach or the kids, would you try and get her on an equidistant ECNL team? Does it make a difference if she is a regional ODP player? Does it matter if her team is poised to play in the national league next year?

Anonymous said...

Only consider it if she is clearly the top dominant player on the team.

Anonymous said...

If she would make a competitive ECNL team and would get playing time you are putting her in the best possible position for recruitment. If she is going to play for one of the non-competitive ECNL teams at this age group (Continental, East Meadow) she may be better playing top flight with her current team at show case tournaments. The weaker ECNL teams will not make ECNL nationals or play against other strong ECNL teams at the regional tournaments. If you name the ECNL team you are considering I could answer your question.

Anonymous said...

PDA, FC Bucks and Penn Fusion under consideration.

Anonymous said...

Also possibly match fit though a little further than bucks and PDA but about the same as penn fusion

Anonymous said...

Daughter moved to one of the teams mentioned . I think PDA, FC Bucks, and Penn Fusion are good choices. We didn't consider Matchfit so cant give you opinion. All 3 coaches responded to an email. 2 of the teams invited us to practice. Email the coaches and go watch them play. They are all playing against each other soon. Good Luck.

Anonymous said...

The answer to the question lies in what your objective is. Sounds like your daughter is happy with her coaching and team. If playing and having fun is the objective then why move? If the objective is a D1 school with a scholarship, then the question is whether your daughter will be a top 5 kid on an ECNL club. You daughter will potentially go from top 5 to top 20-25 with something to prove. Then you need to ask how willing will your coach be to also pick up the phone and talk to a college coach. In my experience with a daughter who plays D3 is that nothing is more important in getting your daughter soon and getting a college coaches attention than an enthusiastic club coach supporter irrespective of the club. If your daughter is interested in playing in college at a D3 level, then I'd say, enjoy the time you have left in soccer. Your daughter realistically has 7 years of competitive soccer left. D3 or D1 will be a battle and a grind the first few years because you will have an underclassman competing for 30+ roster spots. Also, there is the view of big fish little sea or little fish in a big sea and where your daughter will be happiest. Sounds like she's the big fish right now, would she be happy as the little fish.

Anonymous said...

12:29 - You are correct - The objective of what you want from soccer should drive where you play. I do not think that you need to be a top 5 player on an ECNL team to get a D1 scholorship. For example , The top 5 players on PDA will easily get D1 scholorships, the number will probably be 14 or 15 players. The coaches of the ECNL teams will be calling college coaches and pushing for all players. The number of players they get playing at the highest college level is what justifies the $!!! The objective doesn't have to be college to play ECNL. The objective may be as simple as wanting to test herself at the highest possible level of soccer. There is no simple answer, it is a different answer for each player. I will agree, if the player is happy, loving the game, and her current team can help her reach her objective it doesn't make any sense to move.

Anonymous said...

Does it make sense for this kid to try ODP and see if she makes the regional pool? If so is the exposure there? Worried primary team won't get as much exposure and kid has high (possibly not realistic) college aspirations- ACC PAC10 . How do you know if the aspirations of the kid are realistic? No sense moving if not really in the game anyway...

Anonymous said...

Is the ODP selection process corrupt? If so does she have the right connections to get selected?

Anonymous said...

The state selection doesn't seem too hard its at the regional level. Don't know what that situation is regarding politics. Seemed like many different clubs represented so I tend to believe the politics aren't too bad there.

Anonymous said...

I would agree that the ODP Sate Selection appears to be non-political. But that is really tough to verify either way given ALL age groups and gender.

My biggest complaint about ODP is the fact they can invite 500 kids of the same agree group to 'tryout'. Sure, the standout kids can usually still be spotted but you can't form that way. At least in any meaningful sense. They need to improve the tryout process. Or better yet do some actual work and scout kids.

I do appreciate the fact that ODP is non-invasisve from a team perspective. They do not DESTROY teams in order to work. Like so many of the business academies.

DCShore

Anonymous said...

Which business academies destroy teams?

Anonymous said...

Are you talking about 500 kids at regional camp?
They have the individual coaches of the scramble teams recommending kids for the id pool. If a scramble coach doesn't rate your kid, she almost certainly won't make the pool. However, it really then is a triple phased process. Your kid gets picked as 3-5 or so out of 18 from the scramble team to go into the "id" teams then they get picked as 40 out of 100 by several coaches doing evals over several days to make the pool and then they get picked 18 out of 40 to go to Boca- ultimate "prize". While all tryouts have some degree of luck: Did the coach look when she did something well or only glanced up from clipboard when she made a mistake? Does the coach appreciate my child's style of play? Only a relative few make it based on politics as evidence by the wide collection of coaches. Its not like there are one or two coaches trying to evaluate 500 kids at once.

Anonymous said...

question - on academy teams, or teams where coach is paid, do you give a large team gift or any team gift for that matter? just moved my daughter to an academy level team, and was unsure what was appropriate. or does a card suffice?

Anonymous said...

Do what PDA parents do, all give him individual gifts in order to keep in the inner circle.

Anonymous said...

4:02 Are you talking about all of PDA or a specific team?

Anonymous said...

Only required for players 4-30, first 3 are exempt from gift giving. But the optional winter sessions are mandatory, plus request some private training lessons. Otherwise no gift is needed.

Anonymous said...

Fun Question. Who is the best team in NJ? Who is the best team in PA? Answer with positives only. Let's see if we can answer a question without being negative or hateful towards other teams.

Anonymous said...

606 I think we all know which PDA they are referring to.

Anonymous said...

The Pda that lost today?

Anonymous said...

Not everyone lives in the PDA world to know which team who lost or what you are referring to.

Anonymous said...

I saw the Gunners lost today, no news on the other teams, but it is great to see that the other teams doing well. WC has won back to back games against the Gunners and it looks like the other ECNL clubs are stepping up their game.

Anonymous said...

The "inner circle" only exists on PDA South. Better get those Xmas gifts ready.

Anonymous said...

Can someone explain all the hate towards the PDA South team? I know there is a lot of negativity towards PDA as a club which is to be expected when you are successful, but the South team is not near the Gunners Level and its an OK team and yet they always are getting railed on here.

Anonymous said...

It is only a couple of people who are posting and hating on PDA South. Because it is anonymous and they are obsessed they have posted multiple times It appears like a lot of hate but its just a couple of haters whose team lost a few players to PDA South.
Good luck with the rest of the year.

Anonymous said...

4:02 C'mon man, you know that there are people on the team that post negative comments also.

Anonymous said...

Everyone associated with the south team knows all about the inner circle.

Anonymous said...

http://www.mlssoccer.com/news/article/2014/12/08/us-soccer-announce-sweeping-changes-player-development-structures-youth-nati?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=News&utm_campaign=Unpaid

"Seeking “to benchmark itself against other soccer powers,” the federation will also commission an as-yet-undetermined outside group to lead an independent assessment of its youth national teams and Development Academy system.

Starting in the 2016-17 season, it will also add an Under-12 division to the DA's existing U-13/14, U-15/16 and U-17/18 age groups, and will increase funding for the DA's scholarship program in order to open up the nation's premier youth competition to players from humbler economic backgrounds."

*begins slow clap

DCShore

Anonymous said...

DC Shore,

Your information cannot possibly be correct. I have read a lot on this blog that the exclusive pay-for-play system is the only way to develop the future of American Soccer. I've been told the best way to attract the highest quality players is to slap on the word Elite to whatever your doing, charge $2500+/ year and the masses will follow. You also get to charge a premium and are assured to get the highest quality players if the term Elite is somehow connected to the term development and bonus points if you have Academy in your title.

Anonymous said...

@10:27PM

I sense sarcasm :)

If you study THE GAME enough the more you will come to many of my conclusions (maybe some nuance differences here and there). This action being taken is for GOOD reason. The betterment of the U.S. National game and U.S. soccer in general. I applaud this truly GREAT step.


DCShore

Anonymous said...

You are right that these are good steps, but I also think the women's game is very far behind. I also think that our NCAA system is a barrier on both the men's and women's side.

Anonymous said...

@7:03
Sure, but these are steps which will take root and more importantly hold in the next 3-5 years.
IMHO the women's and men's game are equally far behind. Just my opinion.
The athletic advantage the U.S. women had for so long has been negated by the upper echelon of team's. The U.S. men always have a puncher's chance to win but boxer's with a puncher's chance end up with a few upsets but more often than not look outclassed by boxers with true talent.

NCAA system does not help the U.S. National program agreed. Sure it supplies bodies but School Ball at any level is like a box of chocolates. You never know just what you're getting.

I can only hope the U.S. program becomes a network inter-connected leagues where a common-game or at least approach is shared and focus is exclusively on individual player development.

You do not need to travel to Disney to become a better player or see better competition. Dispel myths like this. Let players advance to higher teams based on principled agenda's focused on development and not 'stacking' teams to win...and collection huge checks.

We will all quickly see that state as populous as NJ can support more than one 'Elite' team. In fact there will be dozens. How much more enjoyable will it be to watch? How many more great experiences will player's get to enjoy? How much easier on everyone's pocketbooks? How much better for U.S. Soccer?

This is the type of mentality that I will enthusiastically support...even through the rough learning curve years.

I'm off my soap box...for now.

DCShore


Anonymous said...

Not following you. There won't be more elite teams in the NE with these changes, especially if they are translated to the girls side, there will be fewer. It will be like the pre ECNL era Striker's teams. All the best players will come to the free team, with the best coaches, the best resources, and playing the best competition. Then there will be the next layer. Now if you consider the next layer "elite" also, maybe you are right that the technical level of soccer as a whole might be elevated with promised improved coaching instruction. This is the same model as in Europe which the US seems to want to adopt with its "consultants" yet to be specified coming in.

There is currently a serious dilutional effect going on in the US with all of these girl's leagues in play. No clear winner so the best kids are scattered and not concentrated. In the old USYSA model, the best teams qualified to play in the top competition leagues. There was no argument over who the best teams were since they all regularly played each other in various tournaments and region1 or national league. They all competed for a single championship. The best kids often then left their second tier team to go play at the top- which was clearly defined. There was a natural concentration of coaching and player talent together. Now we can have a great coach, but he doesn't have the talent because he isn't coaching in the ECNL or his club isn't an NPL club etc. We have eliminated the singular great teams led by great and charismatic coaches from the highest success and that is unfortunate.

I am glad that the USSF has finally recognized the "off year" loss to national level development. These are the birth years not associated with FIFA u17 world cup years. There is a u17 WC each year, but it alternates years between girls and boys. In 2014 it was girls. In case you didn't know, in this year's U17 WC the US did not field a U17 ('97)team because we failed to qualify. Anyone citing US women's soccer supremacy should take note of this fact. (and its not the first time- the '93 by u17s failed to qualify also) Further, in September the U20 were knocked out by North Korea and played extremely uninspiring, pedestrian, soccer. That team (technically birthdate on or after 1/1/94) was populated by more than half of the kids who were technically underage because they were carried along from the U17 ('95) national team 2 years before. You cannot tell me there weren't better 1994 birth year kids out there to have been chosen. The US even picked a 1998 "wunderkind" who put forward one of the weakest performances of the tournament. The US had to change its entire strategy when she couldn't hold her own at attacking mid. We then had to utilize Lindsey Horan in that position leaving us weak up top. Unfortunately Horan could not pass to Horan...
Now the system should be better at catching the off years (even years for girls- odd for boys). Other than that all the changes are directed to the DA and boys. The comments on Soccer America suggest there may be more on girls program enhancements in January, but I am not holding my breath. So at this point if you have a national level even year child, this is good news, otherwise not seeing a huge change in the landscape, but hope for more in January.

Anonymous said...

Hard to understand how the US will ever find and develop it best women soccer players until there is a financial incentive to do so. The current system requires good players to finance their own development and it does not come cheap. The selection pool is limited.

Anonymous said...

I wonder if part of the restructure will be to eliminate the Bradenton residency program. I think 6-8 of the current boys u17 ('98) are training overseas as strongly supported by Klinsman. As opposed to US women's soccer strongly discouraging Horan at PSG.

How much money does the USSF get from outside sources such as the MLS?

Anonymous said...

Any commits yet for 2018? The commits are starting for 2017, but haven't heard of any 2018s (despite that NYT article proclamations of 8th grade commits last year).

Anonymous said...

The best players have been to " unofficial", but invited visits but haven't heard of any definite commitments. Will though this spring.

Anonymous said...

Official college visits can only be offered to students in their senior year, and coaches (D-I & D-II) can only contact students after Sept 1st of their junior year, there's no kids in the class of 2018 that fall into these areas.

Nothing prevents a kid from saying "I'm going to XYZ University", but in terms of signing an NLI that's not going to happen for a while.

Anonymous said...

Good luck believing that those rules are followed. The reality is that the D1 college coach calls the kid's club coach and tells him he is interested in the player and says he will be in his office at a certain time to take calls. The player call the coach at that time and they set up an "unofficial visit". The player then verbally commits as early as spring freshmen year. Yes non binding but thought of very poorly if either party does not follow through.

Anonymous said...

What if there was a County type development system? Whichever county a kid lives in, they would have to play on that County’s “Elite” team. The town clubs could charge a minimal “National Team Training” fee to all kids playing in that town to PARTIALLY fund the teams. There’s many different directions this could go from there. In NJ for example there would be 20 or so teams. Some would be better then others but there could then be 2 or 3 flights, a North & South All Star team coming from that, the top flight playing neighboring States top flights etc. Just a thought, might it work?

Anonymous said...

Really to what end?

Anonymous said...

Who is going to want to pay a National Team Training Fee? The fees we all pay already are enough.

Anonymous said...

Very easy, if you have US Club and USYS collect a $1-3 fee for every registered player, you would have a substantial pool of money for both regional and national development. In that model, the entire pool of kids subsidize regional and national development but not to a very significant degree. There are 3 million kids registered with USYS.

Anonymous said...

Just a hypothetical scenario to discuss pros and cons. A County system would be partially subsidized to make it affordable to all, it would have teams moving up and down in flights, travel for practices would be reasonable, it would bring out the best talent locally, etc. What would be some negatives?

Anonymous said...

The biggest negative is politics which embeds itself into player selection. Just like coaches have preferred players on teams a coach for a county or regional team will have preferred players

If you don't think it's right just look at the PA ODP, there is a bias towards Penn Fusion. I have seen kids from NJ who play for Penn Fusion tryout for the PA ODP not NJ. Why, because the coach is from her club.

There is no way to get away from politics and biases.

Anonymous said...

@3:39 “There is no way to get away from politics and biases.”

Agreed you can NEVER fully get away from it, but there is ways to limit it. There is an old saying in politics, “all politics are local”. Maybe all County clubs, due to the fact that club members provide partial funding, have a limited oversight panel where each club gets 1 equal vote, regardless of the club size. If a County “Elite”coach is getting to political, even the smaller clubs would have equal power to vote out a coach or have the problems addressed somewhat.

But yes, nowhere in all corners of our society can you completely get away from politics. Of course this is all hypothetical, the Penn Fusions of the world would not exist under this scenario so ODP could not be biased towards them.

Anonymous said...

Cannot see the system fundamentally changing. The top clubs and leagues successfully exploit our system wherein players finance their own development.

Anonymous said...

Ans what is a "county club". Is there a county organization involved with these soccer clubs or leagues?

Anonymous said...

Lots of good comments above. And a few questions that will need to be answered but it is clear MANY of you see the potential in all of this. And yes it is just a first step.

@8:53AM
"Not following you. There won't be more elite teams in the NE with these changes... Now if you consider the next layer "elite" also, maybe you are right that the technical level of soccer as a whole might be elevated with promised improved coaching instruction. This is the same model as in Europe which the US seems to want to adopt with its "consultants" yet to be specified coming in. "

--->forget the word Elite. As you elude to in the second half of your paragraph, YES I see an overall growth in the player pool for producing top notch players, some of which may participate in National Play. I compare it to acting though. The greatest actors still need a great supporting case. And we all know you can't have a team of GREAT players or the BEST Players. OK, a few European teams come close.
The point remains that if we funnel every player up, or at least try to, we will develop real talent amongst players. Right now the concentration is on building winning teams. Does anybody deny this?
The changes I see coming will grow the sport beyond its your popularity (participation-wise). You could see many more young adults play well into their 20's, at the Club Level. More importantly DEVELOPMENT will be the main focus. Winning at U14 amongst coaches/programs is nice but not the priority. NOT what they are judged on. NOT what they are paid for. Parents will not be marketed to. They will not be fleeced for THOUSANDS (really is insane) each season/year.

BETTER for U.S. soccer and better for our kids to be a part of such a program.

DCShore

Anonymous said...

County teams...because that really takes the politics out of baseball! What happens if your county team has a coach that is not a good match for your daughter? What happens if a player is one of the best players in the country but lives in a county where the soccer is terrible? It is ok to say she will get funneled up, but once a month playing with girls of similar ability is not enough. It would be tough for a player to develop if they are practicing with kids not nearly as good as them. Why should we restrict the place a child can go and play soccer? Regardless of which league you like or hate, at the moment you have a choice. The costs will never go away because there is no money in girls soccer. Women's soccer helps cuts the crazy costs of college for 1000's of kids who get scholarships. To me that is much more important than focusing on developing 20 girls who can maybe beat the Germans. People continue to claim it's all about developing. What percentage of girls who played D1 college are even playing competitively at age 25? What are we developing for? We should be focusing on getting girls money for college and developing a love of the game.Stop focusing on the top of the pyramid as only the very few get there.

Anonymous said...

DC Shore - What is the European model you speak of? If you reference a model can you inform us as to how and where this model operates?.........Many of you are confused about the "European Model". And lets not forget the model you talk about is for the mens game. And lets not forget there are many countries in Europe that all have different models. The most common Model is one that is very similar to what is happening here. Players choose a local club team to play on. If they are good they get to play for their county team. (similar to ODP here). Scouts from premier league clubs take a very small number of players and place them in the academy of that club. The presumed European model that is designed for the men's game and is probably one of the richest sports in the world is not the answer for amateur youth girls soccer in the USA. America has been blessed in Women's soccer for a long-time. Now there are a few countries who can compete with them everyone is at a panic. It is not because America Soccer is getting worse, it is because Women's sports is gaining popularity and acceptance in many European countries so the international teams are improving.

Anonymous said...

Who is in a panic? It is interesting to analyze why teams from a county with such a huge pool of young players can struggle to compete with teams from countries that start off with significantly smaller pool of players.

Maybe it is because international competition is not the goal for most female players here.

Anonymous said...

@9:30PM
I get the terrible impression that you are someone defending their Business Academy. How else can you justify this:
"What is the European model you speak of? If you reference a model can you inform us as to how and where this model operates?.........Many of you are confused about the "European Model". And lets not forget the model you talk about is for the mens game. And lets not forget there are many countries in Europe that all have different models. "

Are you asking or telling me something?
One moment it is "Can you inform us as to how...?", the next moment it is "And let's not forget the model you talk about..."

The European Model, can be further specified by saying the Spanish, or the German, or the Dutch models which YES historically based on the Men's program but in more recent years is now being adopted cross-platform with women. Remember the women's game let alone league's is newer to international competition historically speaking.

"The presumed European model that is designed for the men's game and is probably one of the richest sports in the world"

I have provided countless examples and links to this topic. The European model (again you can specify further with the countries above, is based on player development. Open system league play.

It can be argued that the U.S. women's game has not gotten worse, but the point I make (and so many others) is that our success was based on physical dominance and YES the lack of global participation. Not because we were really doing anything outstanding from a technical perspective.
We mostly out-athletes the competition. Sorry to burst your bubble.

In my honest opinion there are probably 3-4 countries who play a much superior technical game. And it will only get worse.

I'm not going to detail point by point my compete thoughts now but as you have seen in the past I will love time. And DON'T take my word for anything. Listen to what experts are saying and I will once again share links to sources like: http://www.sbnation.com/soccer/2013/1/4/3833932/wasted-diamonds

"Employing and giving the poor a chance to play soccer without financially ruining themselves would solve the issue but instead it seems that the powers that be are happier with soccer being a hobby of the upper middle class. And then complaining about it."

Anonymous said...

http://www.vysa.com/coaches/99579.html

"After all, we need U12 National Champions, otherwise how will we be able to identify the players of the future -- winning is everything. Yet, in the 30-plus years that we have had organized youth soccer on a mass scale, we have not yet produced even one truly world class player! In the long-term development of a soccer player, winning in any particular season means almost nothing. It is the playing and experimentation that are almost everything."

"I have spoken with many world-renowned soccer players and coaches over the 32 years I have been coaching. Basically, they all say we need the same things for to become great at soccer. We need creative players who can play in unique ways, more quickly, and who can score. We recognize the need, and yet beginning at age 8, we force our young players into more rigid and competitive teams where they are recruited to play certain roles so that the "team" can win. We wonder why when we evaluate players at ODP tryouts out of 100 players we see five who have the beginnings of flair, but the 95 other players seem to be cookie-cutter players. When do we allow them to be creative? When do we allow them to try to solve problems in unique ways? When do we allow them to experiment and enjoy the game? When do we allow them the opportunity to search for and learn new solutions, and to do so again and again, thousands of times in thousands of situations? The answer is: we don’t."

DCShore

Anonymous said...

Last post of the night.

http://www.oregonyouthsoccer.org/assets/coaches/Comparing_the_US_Soccer_Environment_to_the_World.pdf

Comparing the US Soccer Environment to the World's Soccer Environment

"Our "top" players stay in their age group or are kept in their age group, to win State Cups or other events. Their top players are pushed up, from an early age, to ensure they are developing their ability - not succeeding due to size and athleticism rather their "footballing" ability.
Our "top" players often play for Clubs with little vision or plan for youth development, and are dependent on the qualities of their individual coach, they often play in Clubs with little or no cooperation between coaches, teams and age groups - sometimes with decisions concerning travel and training made by parents or managers.
Their top players compete in Clubs, who have a vision on youth development, with a boss - who ensures the coaches are placing individual over team development, with an emphasis placed on training enough times (yearly, monthly, yearly) to allow players to develop specific areas of their game."

DCShore

Anonymous said...

One difference with Europe is that the Women's Club's are affiliated with the Men's professional clubs. This means that a women's league on its own does not have to be financially self-sustaining and they are subsidized by the revenue of the whole club. And if you look at Germany, Sweden, and France where there are close links and established good professional leagues you have sen countries whose women's programs have developed well. We have very little link between our MLS and Women's League. But what happens in Europe is that Women have a viable year round program with high level competition. IMO, the person who said it earlier, that the US was better at soccer than world was because we played more and had more athletes than the teams that competed against us in years past. That is no more, and the European National teams have caught up to the US. There is something to be said about a system of professional soccer where there are men and Women's teams within a club.

Anonymous said...

@3:19

Just to be clear though, while you are correct that the women's teams are affiliated with the men's teams (same club) they are more often than not financially independent. Especially in Germany. In other words they do get the benefits of awareness and affilition with long standing clubs but they have to 'earn their own' when it comes to the finances. So it's not like Bayern Munich (proper) invests heavily into the women's program on an annual basis. As you say though, the working benefits of the men's model is the end goal from all levels with these programs. ESPECIALLY from a development point of view. Granted this is a top down approach and it has not worked its way completely, or even substantially down the youth level...but it is heading that way and there are already much stronger strides in Germany than the U.S. as an example.
On the men's side...there is no comparison.
Est ist Das Model!

DCShore

Anonymous said...

actually until clubs can sell youth players as the commodity that they are in Europe there really isn't much difference in the business model for girls and boys development in the US.

Will be interesting to see if the USSF recognizes the ECNL in their promised January release. If they do some sort of anti high school position, many of the role players, at least,on ECNL teams will go back to USYSA.

Anonymous said...

What do you mean "USSF recognizes the ECNL"?

Anonymous said...

So PDA Athletica beats PDA pride? Does that make Athletica the new B team? Seems like a lot of money to play inter club.

Anonymous said...

The Ultimate Closed System...LOL!!!

DCShore

Anonymous said...

Yes , DC Shore, you can see it works well!

Anonymous said...

PDA has never lost a match. When it plays PDA.
And the best part is one set of parents gets to say "We beat PDA today".


DCShore

Anonymous said...

@12:19PM
"actually until clubs can sell youth players as the commodity that they are in Europe there really isn't much difference in the business model for girls and boys development in the US."

---> but don't you see...the incentive for the club is to develop players...they are rewarded for this.
If you don't believe/understand that the U.S. is behind I can't make you. However I'll ask the question again. How's it working out for our National teams?

DCShore

Anonymous said...

Since you brought up USWNT.

Tied China 1-1
Lost to Brazil 3-2

Out with the old in with the New. I know the last coach got fired for that.

Not all women clubs are affiliated with the men side. AND I agree until clubs can get paid to develop players they don't care as long as they win.





Anonymous said...

Stole this from the LI forum because I thought it was interesting:
Your child might get seen and recruited by lower level college coaches at a local league or even high school. But if you think there are any ACC, Big 10, SEC, PAC12 , big east etc coaches looking for the stand out player in that venue, you would be mistaken. Those coaches must be convinced that your child can play at their level. They must see them playing quality competition. The best NEFC players play ODP just for that reason. The competition they face is weak. They prove they can play in the interregional. NPL and region 1 are questionable competition for these coaches. They are looking at national league and ecnl especially champions league and the top teams (who get scheduled to play against each other) at national showcases. The multitude of leagues has hurt many of the better players as it is now harder to show that they are of the level than it was years ago when the best players naturally migrated to the best teams in the state, which by u15, were generally coached by the best coaches. At that time it was much clearer which were the best teams because they were frequently playing against each other in region 1, top tournaments, to which they all applied, and state cup. Now there are top teams playing in all the leagues. The problem is that often they have difficulty finding anyone at their level to play. There are many more unbalanced games now that both top and lower level teams must suffer through than there were years ago. The better programs are recruiting from ecnl, national league, odp interregional and a few top national level tournaments. They might go and see a player of interest at a more local event near the school.
It is an urban myth that if a player is great they will be found no matter what team they play for and at any venue. The idea appeals to our American sense of fairness and reward for good work ethics, unfortunately it just isn't true. I won't even go into the international competition that is increasing scarfing up college spots.

Anonymous said...

@10:02 PM

There you go. How's it all working out for the National Teams? Not very well.

Tom Sermanni was fired because his coaching "philosophy" did not match that of the 'U.S. model'.
"Every coach that comes on has their own philosophy and stamp that they want to put on the game. For us, we're very American, attack-oriented, score goals until the 95th minute," she said. "That's how we are. I think that maybe the direction of the team wasn't going in the direction the federation had hoped, not only the Algarve result, but I think just in general."

So yeah, he was trying to get the team to the point where it did not have to rely on Abby Wambach's freakish physical capabilities (scoring headers in the final minutes of a game) and that takes time and "development". We have to 'win'! ...so yeah Abby...how is that working out for us?

http://espn.go.com/espnw/news-commentary/article/10752007/abby-wambach-says-uswnt-players-not-tom-sermanni-firing

@2:22 PM
Yeah, what you write 'mostly' resembles the way things are. Let's not argue the point at this time of whether or not it should be that way.
All things remaining the same, my advice is to walk any college you attend. Lots of Dummy coaches who are also lazy. So they prefer to be spoon fed. It's a nice business arrangement.
All of this said...how's this working out for U.S. soccer?

DCShore

Anonymous said...

I noted on the ussoccer website that there have been several "Market Training Centers" in region 1 this year. Can anyone comment on the experience that their child has had? Has anyone advanced to national camp through these? Are they competitive? How are the kids chosen who are participating etc.

Anonymous said...

With nearly all the top local teams heading to Florida for the 3 main tournaments it makes me wonder how they can handle all the officiating. Must be 800 teams plus boys tournaments. Anyone have any history on the quality levels for officials at Disney? Hate to travel that far for high school kids. Thoughts? Prior experience?

Anonymous said...

Been a while since I was on here. One to correct one misconception about VA.

Last years' ECNL teams were not way beyond the USYS teams as stated. First thing, Mclean - Chantilly finished in Top 4 and the team is doing about the same as last season. Not a big improvement.

And while ABGC has improved FCV, last year's FCV ECNL team scrimmaged State Cup runner up (and the team that beat Chantilly Elite) and it was a tie and very even game.

Last year, FCV game within a couple second of beating Mclean. ABGC has improved FCV, but it wasn't like last year's team was way below the top USYS teams.

Other than ABGC, last year's team probably had more talent than the USYS team but could never gel because they were put together in June, didn't practice over the summer until mid August, and then asked to plan an ECNL schedule and top brackets against elite level teams that had been together for a while. They also had a roster of 17 and 3-4 girls were hurt every week. The coach was playing girls out of position.

It was a no-win situation and FCV coaching was partly to blame.

Most of the girls who left FCV are now on Bethesda ECNL, Mclean ECNL, or the three top USYS teams (Vienna, Chantilly, and Herndon)

Look at Chantilly Storm, WAGS D2 team that got one of FCV's ECNL a player from Harkes, a key player from Loudoun and Chantilly won WAGS D1. A 1-0 score beating Herndon a week after FCV beat Herndon by the same score.

Headed to R1 league and according to many on ASA and Vienna - the touchest team they faced in the Fall because that team has a very fast, technically strong midfield with very good possession players, combined with a striker who is 6 feet tall with great ball skills, and two center backs that are really tough to beat.

Anonymous said...

Forgot, Richmond United ECNL has has one of the player's from last year's FCV ECNL team.

So much for a second rate team, most of the players are went on to other ECNL teams or significantly improved the remaining USYS teams.

Anonymous said...

I just looked at the NPL Showcase schedules before heading down to Florida to Disney. It does seem that the pecking order in the lower 3 teams has changed, it's seems pretty clear that PDA is protecting their little South team with a powderpuff schedule. Nothing like really challenging yourselves. Seems like 2 of the teams are ranked around 50 in Illinois and Florida I guess the South team has had enough of losing to the FC Stars NPL team that they are going to letting Atletica play them.

Anonymous said...

And now for something completely different. Does anyone know of a place or organiztion in NJ that collects lightly used soccer equipment such as cleats, shinguards, balls, etc. and then distributes them to those in need in the U.S. or international? Thank You.

Anonymous said...

1127, must be nice to already know they will be winning. Better to keep the parents happy and wallets open. PaSouth is mediocre at best and everyone knows it.

Anonymous said...

I think its interesting that ABGC sends its A roster to the national league and leaves its b roster in VA to play a couple of ECNL games. Suggests that the coach is not sure this ECNL thing s going to work out. Got to keep his USYSA options open especially national league. ECNL champions league and National league are equivalent in competition level and exposure.

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